OLSAT Level G Test Preparation and Tips – 2024

G&T Tests Sample Questions

What Is the OLSAT Level G Test?

The OLSAT Level G Test is one type of aptitude test administered to school-age children who are applying for an advanced course in their school, especially for gifted and talented programs. The OLSAT Level G is the highest level of the OLSAT test and is used to test students in 9th through 12th grade. For some students, the OLSAT Level G is considered to be a finnicky test, as the material includes questions they have not previously encountered. This test measures the cognitive abilities of children using verbal and nonverbal tests and subsections.

 

What Are the OLSAT Level G Test Sections?

The OLSAT Level G aptitude test contains 36 verbal and 36 nonverbal questions, with 72 questions in total. 9th – 12th graders will have a total of 60 minutes to complete both test sections. Both the Verbal and Nonverbal Sections will further be split into subsections that will ask the students thorough questions about that specific subsection.

Verbal Section

  • Antonyms: 9th – 12th graders will need to understand the meaning behind a word that is presented to them in order to identify a word from the answer selections that has a differing meaning.
  • Sentence Completion: 9th – 12th graders are required to read sentences that are missing a key word. Students are tasked with completing the sentences by selecting a word from the answers that accurately completes the sentence.
  • Sentence Arrangement: 9th – 12th graders are tasked with arranging several words in a way that forms a meaningful sentence.
  • Arithmetic Reasoning: 9th – 12th graders will see several numbers that are lined up together based on a certain rule. Students will choose the next number that should be added to the line based on that rule.
  • Logical Selection: 9th – 12th graders will be tasked with completing sentences that involve logical scenarios.
  • Word/Letter Matrix: 9th – 12th graders are required to complete a complex word/letter matrix by understanding the way that the words/letters move across the matrix.
  • Verbal Analogies: 9th – 12th graders will first read two words and figure out the reason they are paired together. Afterwards, they will see an individual word, and will be required to choose a second word that follows the same resemblance as the first pair of words.
  • Verbal Classification: 9th – 12th graders are required to identify which word does not belong in a grouping of words.
  • Inference: 9th – 12th graders are tasked with reading and understanding a logical statement and are required to believe that that statement is considered true. Statements are followed by an argument, and students are required to verify whether or not that argument is logical based off of the information from the statements.

Nonverbal Section

  • Pattern Matrix: 9th – 12th graders are required to complete a complex pattern matrix by understanding the way that the patterns move across the matrix.
  • Figural Analogies: 9th – 12th graders will first be presented with a single figure, followed by a group of five figures. Students will then decide which of the five figures most closely matches with the single figure.
  • Figural Series: 9th – 12th graders will see a sequence of figures governed by a specific rule. Based off of that rule, they will infer which figure is supposed to come next.
  • Number Series: 9th – 12th graders will see a sequence of numbers governed by a specific rule. Based off of that rule, they will infer which number is supposed to come next.
  • Number Inference: 9th – 12th graders will read through a number series and figure out the rule that governs the way the numbers are ordered. Based off of that rule, they will infer which number is supposed to come next.
  • Number Matrix: 9th – 12th graders are required to complete a complex number matrix by understanding the way that the numbers move across the matrix.

 

How to Read OLSAT Level G Test Score Report?

  • Raw Score: The number of correct answers from the Verbal and Nonverbal Sections are added together to create the raw score, which will be displayed as the correct answers over 72.
  • School Ability Index (SAI): The raw score of 9th – 12th graders will be compared and normalized to create the SAI score. This score is represented as number up to 150, with the average score being 100.
  • Percentile Rank: The normalized SAI score is transformed into a personalized Percentile Rank, which is simply a percentage representing the amount of students your child scored higher than.

 

OLSAT Level G Test Tips

  1. Practice every single test section. Even if your student feels confident about certain subsections, they need to be aware that the actual test will have varying degrees of questions ranging in difficulty. Just because your student thinks they have mastered a certain section does not mean they have. Practice each individual section in its entirety several times.
  2. Prepare a set study routine. If left up to the students, they will likely choose to not study. In these cases, it may be helpful to create a daily study routine that allocates a certain amount of time to preparing for the OLSAT exam.

 

How to Prepare for the OLSAT Level G Test?

As previously mentioned, the OLSAT Level G Test is the highest OLSAT test, as it tests students that are in 9th through 12th grade. High school can be a difficult time for a lot of students. High schoolers constantly compare scores and may ridicule those who score lower. With the added pressure, it is important that your 9th – 12th grader feel confident on test day. This is accomplished by conducting in-depth studies using practice exams and online study guides. Students need to complete several practice exams in order to familiarize themselves with the complex material that this test covers. Students that fail to prepare will almost certainly have test scores that reflect the lack of preparation. Make sure that your 9th – 12th grader has adequately prepared and is familiar with the OLSAT Level G testing material, as it will help them gain possible admittance into a gifted and talented program.