NYC Gifted and Talented Test Online Preparation: Free Practice Questions, Samples & Tips – 2024

Aptitude Tests Preparation

If you are located in New York City and are hoping to enroll your child into a gifted and talented program, your child’s school may require them to take a NYC gifted and talented assessment. Specialized programs in NYC are extremely competitive and the aptitude tests are difficult. This article will teach you all about how to ace the NYC gifted and talented test.

What Is the NYC Gifted and Talented Test?

The NYC Gifted and Talented test is a type of aptitude assessment that is administered by the New York City Department of Education (DOE) to children that are 4 to 7 years of age, or children in grades kindergarten through 3rd grade. These tests are used to measure the cognitive abilities in young children. Students that score well on this exam are considered to have exceptional learning abilities and only the top few scorers will be placed into a gifted and talented program.

The NYC Gifted and Talented test is extremely unique. The test uses material taken from two well-known aptitude tests. Verbal questions are utilized from the Otis-Lennon School Ability Test (OLSAT) and the nonverbal questions are utilized from the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT). The questions on these exams are relatively difficult, even for adults. The material covered on these exams do not include material that is typically taught in school, making this a difficult exam to study for. Students that score well on the NYC Gifted and Talented test will have likely prepared weeks in advance with study materials and resources found online.

 

 NYC G&T Test by levels:

NYC Gifted and Talented Level A Test
NYC Gifted and Talented Level B Test
NYC Gifted and Talented Level C Test

 

What Are NYC’s Gifted and Talented Test Sections?

The NYC Gifted and Talented Test will include two sections: a Verbal Section and a Nonverbal Section. Both of these sections will account for half of the overall composite score, regardless of the amount of questions that are asked per section. The scoring method is different than other types of aptitude tests, which usually average every section’s scores together. Within both the Verbal and Nonverbal Sections, there will be several subsections that will ask in-depth questions about specific topics relating to those sections. The number of subsections that a student will be required to take will depend on the level of test the child is taking.

Verbal Section

The Verbal Section is entirely made up of questions taken from the OLSAT exam. In total, the Verbal Section will ask students 30 questions, and the results from this section will account for one-half of a student’s overall composite score. Although this section does include verbal questions, students will not be expected to read at lower levels. Instead, the questions and their instructions will be read to the students out loud by a designated test proctor or teacher. Students will need to listen to the directions carefully, as they will only be read out loud once. Students will not be allowed to ask the teacher or test proctor to repeat the questions. Students completing the Verbal Section of the NYC Gifted and Talented Test may be asked to complete one or more of the following subsections.

Subsection Questions NYC Testing Level Description
Following Directions NYC Level A – C The Following Directions subsection uses questions designed to assess each child’s ability for matching verbal descriptions with pictorial representations. A teacher or test proctor will read the directions aloud and may include words like “between,” “next to,” or “below.”
Aural Reasoning NYC Level A – C The Aural Reasoning subsection uses questions that require children to examine functions, classifications, and characteristics of pictures. The students will take part in a cognitive process that requires them to visualize the situation provided to them, understand details that are relevant, and form an entire and complete picture based on what was described. This includes understanding main ideas, inferences, details, and possible or probable outcomes.
Arithmetic Reasoning NYC Level A – C The Arithmetic Reasoning subsection uses questions designed to assess each child’s ability for solving verbal problems based on drawing numerical reasoning solutions. Students will need to infer relationships, understand computational rules, while also predicting numerical outcomes.

 

Nonverbal Section

The Nonverbal Section is entirely made up of questions taken off of the NNAT exam. In total, the Nonverbal Section will ask students 48 questions, and the results from this section will account for one-half of a student’s overall composite score. The Nonverbal Section includes questions that are designed to test a child’s abstract spatial reasoning skills. Because the Nonverbal Section uses very few, if any, words, the section is a great way for students with underdeveloped language skills to excel on this test. It also provides an even playing ground for students of all backgrounds, even for those who have a different first language other than English. Students completing the Nonverbal Section of the NYC Gifted and Talented Test may be asked to complete one or more of the following subsections.

Subsection Questions NYC Testing Level Description
Pattern Completion NYC Level A – C The Pattern Completion subsection uses questions designed to assess a child’s ability to recognize patterns among shapes and figures. Students will need to look through the design that is presented to them and complete the pattern by choosing an answer that accurately fills in the missing portion.
Reasoning by Analogy NYC Level A – C The Reasoning by Analogy subsection uses questions designed to assess a child’s ability to recognize relationships among various geometric shapes.
Serial Reasoning NYC Level A – C The Serial Reasoning subsection uses questions designed to assess a child’s ability to recognize sequences among shapes.

 

 

How to Read NYC’s Gifted and Talented Test Score Report

Every student will receive a score report several weeks after completing the NYC gifted and Talented Test. The score report will include several scores that will display how your child performed throughout the exam. The overall score is first determined by adding up the amount of answers responded to correctly from each section. Keep in mind that the individual section scores will not be added together, unlike other types of aptitude tests. The sum of the scores is shown as the raw score. The highest raw score possible for the Verbal Section is 30 and 48 for the Nonverbal Section.

The raw scores are then compared with other students throughout NYC and ranked. The norm ranks are converted into normal curve equivalents (NCE), which are considered to be a scaled score. Students will see their final score shown as a percentile between 1 and 99. In order to be admitted into a gifted and talented program in NYC, students will need to score within the top percentile for their age.

 

NYC Gifted and Talented Test Tips

  1. Take advantage of any explanations provided at the end of a practice exam. During the actual NYC Gifted and Talented Test, students will not receive explanations for why a question was answered right or wrong. However, at the completion of a practice exam, you will receive detailed explanations for every single question that will teach you about how to answer any difficult questions. Explanations for every single question should be read, even if your child answered it right. There are times when a question could be answered correctly, but it may be a result of a lucky guess.
  2. It may be helpful to ask your child to say their thought process out loud. It is important that parents occasionally sit down with their child during studying sessions to make sure that their child is understanding the information. If there is a particular section that you feel your child is not grasping, have them explain their thought process out loud to you. This could help you identify which parts your child is not understanding and you can help steer them back on track to understanding any difficult information.
  3. Each question deserves the same amount of time. There will be times where your child runs across a question that they don’t immediately know the answer to. When this happens, it is important that your child not waste too much time trying to answer a single question. The entire NYC Gifted and Talented Test is timed, which means students don’t have unlimited time to pay attention to difficult questions. One of the best things to do when trying to answer a tricky question is rule out any answers that are obviously wrong, and then answer with the first answer that pops in your mind.
  4. Practice and become familiar with the process of elimination. This is one of the best tools to have in your tool box. When those tricky questions appear, the process of elimination can help your child narrow down the answer to two or three feasible possibilities. The process of elimination works by identifying answers that are obviously wrong, and removing them from the possibilities. Continue doing this process until you cannot any longer. Your child should be left with two or three possibilities, which will give them a better chance at answering the question correctly.
  5. Make sure to start studying at least two weeks in advance. Some schools are notorious for not notifying parents that their child will be taking a NYC Gifted and Talented Test until the very last second. However, as soon as you find out that your child is taking it, you need to start preparing with practice exams. Practice exams are designed to be repeatedly taken until your child has a firm grasp on the material. This cannot be accomplished if you wait until a few days beforehand to start cramming. This kind of studying method usually results in a severe loss of information very quickly. If possible, children should be studying at least two weeks in advance, which gives them plenty of time to soak up the new information.

How to Prepare for the NYC Gifted and Talented Test

Gifted and talented programs in New York City are extremely competitive and coveted. Many children will take the NYC Gifted and Talented Test, but only a few will be selected to join a specialized program. Gifted and talented programs are considered to be exceptional opportunities for a number of reasons. Mainly, these programs teach children information at a faster rate than their peers, which allows students to learn more information in a shorter amount of time. These programs also introduce students to other gifted students, and they will be able to learn new ideas off of each other. Gifted and talented programs are not offered by every school, making the opportunity to join one rare and sought-after.

In order to prepare for the NYC Gifted and Talented Test, parents need to first know what to prepare for. The easiest way to become acquainted and familiarized with the testing material is through the use of online resources, including practice exams and study guides. Generally, study guides include sample questions that introduce you to the type of questions your child will be asked as well as detailed explanations regarding why certain questions require a certain response. Practice exams also help your child be able to identify patterns that are usually obscure. Without the use of practice exams, the testing material and format that your child sees during the actual exam will likely all be new information, which could be extremely overwhelming for children. The easiest and best way to prepare for the NYC Gifted and Talented Test is through the extensive use of online practice exams and other study material.

NYC G&T Test Sample Questions

  1. Together, John and Emily ate half of a pizza. Mark the picture that shows the pizza after John and Emily finished eating.
    NYC G&T Test Sample Question 1
  2. Mark the picture that shows an apple before the grapes and a cherry before the apple.
    NYC G&T Test Sample Question 2
  3. Mark the picture of a boy sitting on a boat in a sea with no fish, during the day.
    NYC G&T Test Sample Question 3
  4. Mark the picture that shows one yacht pointing in the right direction and one yacht pointing in the left direction.
    NYC G&T Test Sample Question 4

 

Answers:

  1. C
  2. B
  3. C
  4. B

Why Does My Child Need to Take the NYC Gifted and Talented Test?

The NYC Gifted and Talented Test is a type of aptitude test that includes several unexpected perks. Firstly, the results from this test will help you understand your child’s mental capacity. You can gauge how well they pick up on topics that they previously did not understand. Additionally, every parent should be excited about their child potentially joining a gifted and talented program. These programs move at an accelerated pace, which allows students to learn more information in a short amount of time. Gifted students that don’t enroll into these types of programs may feel that the normal school pace is not challenging enough.

Is This Test Offered in Any Language Other than English?

If your child speaks a different language as their first language other than English, they may be eligible to take the NYC Gifted and Talented Test in their native language. Parents should make a formal request to the school board notifying them that their child needs a special test. This request is known as a Request for Testing (RFT) form. Please note that not all languages are offered on this test, and only include the following:

  • Spanish
  • French
  • Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese)
  • Arabic
  • Korean
  • Russian
  • Urdu
  • Bengali
  • Haitian Creole

When Is the NYC Gifted and Talented Test Usually Administered?

The NYC Gifted and Talented Test is almost always administered throughout the month of January. The results from this test usually take a few months to prepare, and are typically delivered to the parents in early April. Children that qualify for gifted and talented programs will receive a score report that includes an application, which will ask parents to write down their schools and programs of preference based on a ranking. Parents must send applications back by late April, and admission decisions will be sent out at the end of May.

Which Grade Levels Will Take the NYC Gifted and Talented Test?

This test is currently only being administered to children that are between 4 and 7 years in age. The results from this exam allow children starting in at least 3rd grade to potentially join a gifted and talented program. As the children grow older, the difficulty level will increase with each test.

Can the Test Proctor Reread the Question and Instructions If My Child Did Not Understand It?

The answer is no, test proctors cannot read any question or instruction after it has already been said out loud. It is therefore important that you teach your child to pay close attention the first time a question is read, as they will not get another chance to hear it be read.

What Score Will My Child Need in Order to Be Accepted into a NYC Gifted and Talented Program?

First, it is important to note that New York City has two separate types of gifted and talented programs, including a citywide program and a district program. In order for your child to be eligible for a citywide program, they will need to score within the top 97th percentile or above. In order for your child to be eligible for a district program, they will need to score within the top 90th percentile or above. Please keep in mind that these are generalized scores, and each school may have their own requirements. In recent years, competition for these programs have been strong, and some schools required a score of 99th percentile in order to be eligible for a specialized program.

Will Parents Be Able to See Which Questions Their Child Answers Correctly and Incorrectly?

Although parents are allowed to review their child’s exam, it will take a few additional steps. Parents will need to make an appointment with the Department of Education in advance and will need to follow several strict rules. Parents will only receive roughly 10 minutes to review their child’s test, and they will not be aloud to write anything down or take any pictures. However, it can still be useful for a parent to review the test, as you can identify which areas your child needs to focus more on.

How Do Parents Register Their Children to Take the NYC Gifted and Talented Test?

Parents need to submit a Request for Testing (RFT) form two months before the test is administered, which means forms need to be submitted at the beginning of November. Parents can submit these forms either online or in-person at the school. Parents cannot mail the form in.