Free Online CCAT Test Preparation: Practice CCAT Sample Questions & Tips – 2024

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What Is the CCAT Test?

The Canadian Cognitive Abilities Test, abbreviated as CCAT, is an assessment that measures the cognitive abilities of students in grades K-12. The test is used as an administrative guideline for admittance into a Canadian gifted and talented program. Additionally, depending on the child’s age, the test will have different names. For example, a kindergartener will be taking the CCAT Kindergarten Test, also known as the CCAT Level 5/6. The reason for this is because the test will be assessing the abilities of 5 and 6-year-olds. Starting in 2018, the most recent version of this exam is the CCAT 7, which is published by a company known as Nelson Education.

 

CCAT Levels Per Grade

CCAT Testing Level Grade
Level 5/6 Kindergarten
Level 7 1st Grade
Level 8 2nd Grade
Level 9 3rd Grade
Level 10 4th Grade
Level 11 5th Grade
Level 12 6th Grade
Level 13/14 7th -8th Grade
Level 15/16 9th -10th Grade
Level 17/18 11th -12th Grade

 

What Are CCAT’s Test Sections?

Regardless of age, the CCAT will be broken into three distinct batteries, including a Quantitative Battery, a Nonverbal Battery, and a Verbal Battery. Then, each of the three batteries will be further divided into three subcategories, also known as subsections. Each subsection is used to measure a child’s ability level for each section. It is important to note that some schools will choose to administer all three sections all at once, while other schools may choose to only administer one section at a time.

Verbal Battery

  • Sentence Completion: Children in kindergarten through 2nd grade will have a teacher read them a sentence out loud that includes a missing word. They will look through several options presented as pictures and choose a picture that would complete the sentence. Children in 3rd grade or higher will instead read the sentence and choose a word instead of a picture.
  • Picture/Verbal Analogies: Children in kindergarten through 2nd grade will complete a Picture Analogies subsection, where they will solve for a missing picture analogy by determining relationships between pictures. Students in 3rd grade or higher will do the same thing, except they will complete a Verbal Analogies subsection, where the pictures will be replaced with words.
  • Picture/Verbal Classification: Children in kindergarten through 2nd grade will complete a Picture Classification subsection, where they will see a grouping of similar pictures and will need to choose a fourth picture that matches the similarity. Students in 3rd grade or higher will instead complete the Verbal Classification subsection, where they will see similar words and will need to choose a word that holds the same similarity.

Nonverbal Battery

  • Figure Classification: Children in K-12th grade will all see three shapes that are grouped together based on a similarity. They will then choose a fourth image that follows the figure classification pattern.
  • Figure Matrices: Children in K-12th grade will see a matrix with 2×2 dimensions. Within the matrix, there will be three shapes, with two on the top row and one on the bottom row. The top row of shapes will go together in some way. The students will then solve the bottom matrix row by figuring out the pattern in the top row and applying it to the bottom row.
  • Paper Folding: Children in kindergarten through 2nd grade will see how a piece of paper goes through one or more folding manipulations. They will then figure out how the paper should look once it completes the folding steps. Children in 3rd grade or higher will also see how a piece of paper is folded, but that piece of paper will also receive several hole punches. Then, they will figure out how the paper would look once it was unfolded.

Quantitative Battery

  • Number Puzzles: Children in kindergarten through 2nd grade will see a set of trains carrying a number of items. They will figure out how many items the next train needs to carry in order to follow the predetermined mathematical rule. Children in 3rd grade or higher will see a simple mathematical equation that could involve addition or subtraction. They will then need to solve the equation.
  • Number Series: Children in kindergarten through 2nd grade will be presented with an abacus toy with several rods of strung beads. The last rod of beads will be missing, and the children will figure out how many beads should be on the last rod. Children in 3rd grade or higher will instead see a list of numbers that follow a mathematical pattern, and they will decide what number comes next in the pattern.
  • Number Analogies: Children in kindergarten through 2nd grade will be presented with images that hold a mathematical similarity. Students in 3rd grade or higher will instead see sets of numbers. In both cases, the students will then see either a single picture or number that requires them to identify the pattern and find the picture or number’s partner.

 

How to Read CCAT’s Score Report?

All children taking the CCAT exam will receive a similar-looking score report. Each score report is composed of three individual scores, specifically an Age Percentile Rank (APR), Stanine (S) rank, and a Grade Percentile Rank (GPR). The APR will signify how each student scores compared to same-age students. The GPR signifies how each student scored compared to same-grade students. The Stanine rank relays a number that represents the learning and cognitive abilities in children, with 1 being a very low score and 9 being a very high score.

 

CCAT Tips

  1. Your child needs at least two weeks to prepare. Children that wait until a few days out to start studying will undoubtedly feel less prepared than their schoolmates that studied. Children need at least two weeks to start studying, but even more time would be preferred. Set a daily schedule that includes one to two hours of dedicated study time. This will allow your child to become familiar with the testing material without feeling overwhelmed with pressure.
  2. Learn about testing time limits. In general, children only have 30 to 45 minutes to complete every battery, depending on their age. This means that they will have to answer a large number of questions within a short amount of time. During your studying process, make sure you include time limits. It is imperative that your child knows how much time they have to allocate to each question.

 

How to Prepare for the CCAT Test?

The CCAT exam can be a difficult exam, especially for students who have never taken a test like it before. Even if your child has taken academic tests, the format of the CCAT exam will be unfamiliar. The reason for this is because the CCAT exam measures a student’s potential, not the information they have memorized. This means that you cannot expect your child to sit down, memorize specific information, and then use that information on the exam. Instead, you need to strengthen your child’s reasoning and problem-solving skills, as those will be tested on the exam. The best way to do this is through constantly practicing and preparing with practice exams that can be found online. Make sure to have your child start practicing with practice exams at least two weeks in advance. You will also want to ensure that they are reading through and understanding the explanations provided at the end of the practice exam. The exam explanations will teach you and your child about how to answer difficult questions correctly and will provide you with in-depth knowledge about the test questions. The easiest way to prepare your child for the CCAT exam is through constant use of practice exams, which will ultimately give them the best chances of receiving a high score.